FAQ

Q

I cooked using a mizutaki fish hot-pot. I left ingredients inside of the pot until the next day. Although I washed the pot before putting it away, the odor from the hot-pot wouldn't go away. What should I do to remove the odor?

A

Since the earthen pot is water-absorbent, odors may become absorbed into the pot surface. In this case, please boil clean water in the pot, then add a small amount of vinegar and bring it back to a boil. Leave the pot until it has cooled down, wash it out with water only, dry it thoroughly, and put it away. Depending on the odor, it may be better to repeat this process twice. Please note that if you put too much vinegar in the pot or leave the pot with vinegar in it for too long, the smell of the vinegar may be transferred to the pot.

Q

I'm a staff member of a home center. I heard that a Hana-Mishima earthen pot is different from other earthen pots. What kind of differences are there? Is it a difference in material or another special feature?

A

The differences lie in the materials and production methods. To maintain the quality, our company purchases carefully selected raw materials, prepares the soil and we do our own glazing in house. We have established an integrated production process from soil preparation to firing. Ginpo is Japan's only earthen pot maker that has acquired an "ISO 9001" certification. The significant difference from other earthen pots companies' is the grade of their heat resistant material called "petalite." While the generally used grade for earthen pots is standard petalite, Ginpo uses the highest grade called "low-alkali petalite."
This material is procured by asking a petalite mine to specially dress it. In particular, currently Ginpo is the only manufacturer in the world that uses low-alkali petalite for earthen pots.
As much as more than 50% of the content of Ginpo's earthen pot is this high-grade petalite. (The greater the content of petalite in its raw material, the greater the improvement in the pot's heat resistance.)

Q

I have used a size #10 Hana-Mishima earthen pot. This product I think is not IH-compatible. If I use an IH-compatible plate for the pot, can the pot be used as an IH-compatible earthen pot?

A

A Hana Mishima pot, which is designed to be used on a direct fire, and an IH-compatible Hana Mishima earthen pot have different shapes. An IH-compatible Hana Mishima earthen pot's inner bottom is hollowed out to allow the plate to fit, and its outer bottom has a larger flater area. So unfortunately, the plate for an IH-compatible Hana Mishima earthen pot cannot be used with a Hana Mishima pot that is meant to be used on a direct fire, because the plate cannot be fixed inside.

Q

The other day, I purchased a Hana-Mishima earthen pot. After sealing the earthen pot, I cooked soy milk with the pot, but the ingredients were burned black and stuck to the bottom of the earthen pot. I was able to remove the scorched residue by scratching it with chopsticks, but a fine stain-like mark has been left on the pot inside of the pot surface. This is not a problem for using the pot, but I am concerned about it, and hope to learn about how to remove it.

A

Unlike a metal pot, an earthen pot has a feature of water-absorbency. Although the water-absorbency reduces as the pot is used, when the pot is first used, it can easily absorb water, which also can cause staining. Although this phenomenon can be controlled to a certain degree through pretreatment before use, it is not perfectly controlled. Also, since the surface treatment, such as fluorine processing, has not been applied to the earthen pot, the ingredients inside may be burned black and stick to the inside of the pot depending on how it is used. The scorched residue sticking to the pots inner surface can be removed by scrubbing it with a hard sponge and sodium bicarbonate not chopsticks or similar products(a cleanser can be used instead), but we are afraid that burn marks that have created stains on the inner surface cannot be removed. However, it is not a problem to use the pot bearing such stains.

Q

I heard that the earthen pot can be used in a cooking oven and a microwave oven. Can the pot be used for such dishes as gratin? Can it be used for cooking stir-fry?

A

When using an oven, please remove the lid and use the pot in the oven. Of course, the pot can also be used for cooking gratin. When using a microwave oven, the lid can be kept on the pot when cooking. Although the pot can be used for cooking stir fries, please note that the earthen pot is water-absorbent, and may become stained or acquire a burn mark when the ingredients inside are scorched.

Q

I have the strong impression that the earthen pot is delicate. Is it OK to wash the pot with ordinary dishwashing detergent or a cleanser? Is it all right to scrub the pot strongly with a brush?

A

Although it may be washed with dishwashing detergent, please avoid soaking the earthen pot in a solution of dishwashing detergent and water before washing it, because the pot is water-absorbent. Using a scrub brush on the pot is also OK, but a metal scrub brush may leave marks on the pot. Please use such brushes only moderately. After washing the pot, please dry it thoroughly for storage.

Q

The pot does not respond to an IH cooking device.

A

Before use, please make sure that the attached heating plate is fitted closely to the bottom of the earthen pot with the "Ginpo" logo mark facing up. If the plate is set upside down, the pot will not respond to an IH cooking device. If the plate only loosely fits in the pot, please see the User Manual, and adjust the plate with its tabs. If the pot still does not respond to an IH cooking device, please contact us.

Q

Can I wash an earthen pot in a dishwashing machine?

A

Since there are various types of dishwashing machines, it is better not to use a dishwashing machine to wash the pot. Since an earthen pot, regardless of its strength, cannot be dried thoroughly by a dishwashing machine, the pot may become smelly or moldy. It needs to dry naturally for best results.

Q

Where do Ginpo's raw materials come from?
Are toxic substances such as lead or cadmium used in your pots?

A

We use soil from Aichi, Gifu, Shiga, and Okayama Prefectures as raw materials for our pot. We also order our heat-resistant raw material from South Africa. All the raw materials are mixed and prepared in our manufacturing plant. No toxic substances, such as lead or cadmium, are used in any of our products.

Q

I am looking for an earthen pot for a family of four. Which do you recommend, Hana Mishima or Sumi Kannyu?

A

Hana Mishima is a deep-type earthen pot, and has a larger capacity. Sumi Kannyu is a shallow-type pot mainly for professional use. Roughly speaking, the size 9 Hana Mishima pot and the size 10 Sumi Kannyu pot have nearly the same capacity. For a general family of four, the size 9 Hana Mishima pot is probably large enough. However, this may not be the case depending on your cooking methods in your family, such as whether you add many ingredients at once or add ingredients little by little, or whether your family eats a lot.

* Yardstick of sizes of Hana Mishima pots

#6
For one person
#7
For two persons
#8
For two to three persons
#9
For three to four persons
#10
For four to five persons